Ultra-Surrealism: The Digital Art of Andrey Bobir

ConsciensWhile doing background research on this week’s featured artist, Andrey Bobir, and his trippy surreal art,  I was a little surprised that I was unable to uncover much on the man, or his interesting photo-realistic technique.

What I did discover was that he is 27 years old and he lives and works in Almaty, the former capital of Kazakhstan. All of the work seen here was created digitally using 3ds max and Photoshop, his preferred medium. Themes of loss, alienation, loneliness, the concept of consciousness and an overall pessimistic view of technology are common themes that he revisits in his work.

As I like to say in cases like this, perhaps it’s best to let the art speak for itself, in this case, the ultra-surrealist digital art of Andrey Bobir. Check out the gallery after the jump.

 

About Stephen Kelly

Hi, I'm Stephen Kelly, a writer, editor, photographer and graphic designer living in beautiful San Francisco, CA, USA. Amongst the things I love are writing, photography, movies, music, fitness, travel, Batman, all things Australian, food and fun, all of which I hope to reflect in this here blog. Welcome aboard ... now let's get busy!
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22 Responses to Ultra-Surrealism: The Digital Art of Andrey Bobir

  1. Reblogged this on power of h Weblog and commented:
    wonderful work

  2. Thanks for introducing us to this fascinating artist. I love the Temple of the Wind.

  3. Surreal is right, even ultra-surreal! There’s also something very cool, even chilly, about the way the torsos and heads and some of the landscapes are figured.

  4. Kevin Bradberry says:

    Yay, surrealism.

  5. Jo Bryant says:

    this is just fascinating

  6. pommepal says:

    I’m amazed at where you find these artists Stephen. These are quite mesmerising and some of them disturbing, but all are fascinating

  7. thephotoseye says:

    These are really quite amazing! They are all very surreal with a certain darkness.

  8. Pat says:

    Nope, I didn’t connect with his work at all. I do connect with your art lessons, however. I look forward to them, but because of a busy couple of weeks, I was late getting to this one.

    • Hi Pat … actually, I’m surprised so many people connected with his work. I’m not sure exactly where I stand on it. It’s good stuff, but it’s a bit too chilly for my tastes.

      • Pat says:

        I think you hit it – work can be creative and artistic, but not aesthetically appealing to some of us. But we can still respect him as an artist.

  9. viveka says:

    Stephen, this don’t talk to me at all … far to dark and wired, but I really like the apple. That is a fantastic piece … there is something in that piece, that even if it’s cut in half and damaged in that way … is there hope with the new tree growing out from it. A big like us humans … that even if we are damage we can provide something positive.

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